French scientists are studying a mesmerizing charcoal drawing that has been dubbed the “Nude Mona Lisa.” The sketch is of a topless woman with a face similar to that of Leonardo da Vinci’s iconic Mona Lisa. New technology and rigorous testing has enabled a deeper dive into the history of the drawing, including an appraisal by experts at the Center for Research and Restoration of the Museums of France.  The colorless sketch has been held in the collection of the Condé Museum since 1862.

Appraising or assessing the value of works of art is necessary in a variety circumstances. The most common reasons for art valuations are those performed for tax purposes, insurance claims, and lawsuits arising over art that is lost, stolen, damaged or destroyed as well as works that are misrepresented by a seller to a buyer.

The importance of professional valuations, including what makes one Van Gogh or da Vinci worth more than another and how one type of damage to art matters more than another are questions to be explored at the Art Law & Litigation Seminar in Miami, Florida on 12/6/17.  Speakers Elizabeth von Hapsburg (Managing Director, Winston Art Group) and Gloria Velandia (Chief Conservator, Art Basel Miami) will analyze art appraisals and discuss how art gets re-valued after damage. Register now for the seminar: http://www.fedbar.org/Education/Calendar-CLE-events/2017-Art-Law-Litigation-Conference.aspx.

An appraisal is a legal document that can accurately describe the value of artwork. A properly prepared appraisal by a qualified appraiser will clarify questions of value. Panelists at the Art Law Seminar will consider the shortcomings of the appraisal process and what are lessons to be learned from important cases involving appraisals of works of art by artists like Picasso, Chagall, and Warhol.  Attendees will get an introduction to industry standards and best practices in terms of research and analysis.

Collectors, conservators, artists, museums, galleries, restoration specialists, insurers, and lawyers need to know how damage and repairs can affect a piece’s value. When it comes to protecting the value of one’s art, the manner in which a piece was damaged doesn’t matter as much as how the owner can go about restoring the piece’s value or recovering it if the piece is deemed a total loss. Panelists will examine the worth of damaged art and disputes between owners and insurance companies. What follows is a look at damage and restoration in the world of art collecting, and how owners can best protect their pieces.

Join the Federal Bar Association on 12/6/17 as esteemed speakers bring several decades’ worth of knowledge and experience to the topic of art appraisals. Register for the Art Law & Litigation Seminar, debuting ahead of Art Basel Miami Beach, to engage in a thought-provoking journey into law, art, and the intersection of the two. Sign up on or before 11/3/17 to save with early bird rates at http://www.fedbar.org/Education/Calendar-CLE-events/2017-Art-Law-Litigation-Conference.aspx.


Stacy Slotnick, Esq. holds a J.D., cum laude, from Touro Law Center and a B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She performs a broad range of duties as an entertainment lawyer, including drafting and negotiating contracts; addressing and litigating trademark, copyright, patent, and other IP issues; and directing the strategy and implementation of public relations, blogging, and social media campaigns.