Art occupies an important and increasingly prominent role in our lives that serves many functions for businesses, governments, museums, and artists. There are a host of legal, ethical, and commercial questions for art lawyers to explore. Thus, the South Florida Chapter of the Federal Bar Association, in cooperation with the Intellectual Property Law and Federal Litigation Sections of the FBA, is launching the first annual Art Law & Litigation Conference on Wednesday, Nov. 30 in Miami, Florida. Register today at www.fedbar.org/artlaw16. Law students can attend for only $90! All registered attendees are invited to the Welcome Reception on Tuesday, Nov. 29 at the Lowe Art Museum at the University of Miami from 5:00–6:30 p.m.

Headline-worthy battles between artists, foreign countries, collectors, and art institutions have attracted large amounts of media attention. What would the top art law litigators have to say about art fairs and galleries allowing visitors to Instagram or Snapchat art? Should that practice be considered fair use or copyright infringement?  Learn about recommended resources, practice tips, and pitfalls to avoid while building a law practice representing visual artists, galleries, art dealers, and other players in the world of fine art.

For law school students, newly admitted attorneys, and even veteran lawyers, art law is an attractive field of practice. Art law places various legal disciplines under one roof, since it is made up of contract, constitutional, business, international, and intellectual property law, to name a few.

Speakers for the first annual Art Law & Litigation Conference include curators from museums, representatives of auction houses, art fair founders, attorneys who litigate provenance and authenticity matters, and judges. Lisa F. Moore and Andrew Pequignot from The Moore Firm, LLC; Steve Schindler, Partner at Schindler Cohen & Hochman LLP; and Terry Vento, the Deputy Director for Legal and Government Affairs & General Counsel at the Perez Art Museum Miami shall serve as panelists for “Developing an Art Law Practice: Hot Topics, Practice Tips.”

Interested in serving as general counsel for a major museum or auction house? Maybe your dream is to represent private collectors. Art lawyers can provide strategic consulting and collections management in the fields of estates and trusts, corporate law, branding and licensing, and publicity rights.

Attend the Art Law & Litigation Conference on Nov. 30 to learn about claims involving international law, the treatment of abandoned art, sales of forged or improperly accredited work, financial transactions, exhibition agreements, not-for-profit governance issues, and the unique public relations considerations often associated with the art world. Mingle and network with prominent appraisers, private collectors, curators, and brokers. Discuss their areas of expertise and absorb firsthand the art of developing an art law practice.

With such a rich and revered group of lawyers and judges serving on panels, the FBA’s Art Law & Litigation Conference will provide effective information on issues pertaining to the arts, law, public policy, and general business. The goal is to make the law clear for the creative community as well as lawyers. Those interested in art, curating, finance, bankruptcy, torts, writing, economics, sociology, urban planning, political science, and history are encouraged to attend. Sign up today at www.fedbar.org/artlaw16 and follow the FBA’s new blog at blog.fedbar.org!


Stacy Slotnick, Esq. holds a J.D., cum laude, from Touro Law Center and a B.A., summa cum laude, from the University of Massachusetts Amherst. She performs a broad range of duties as an entertainment lawyer, including drafting and negotiating contracts; addressing and litigating trademark, copyright, patent, and other IP issues; and directing the strategy and implementation of public relations and social media campaigns.